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Otoe-Missouria News Archive

News archive for the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma

Archive for the ‘people’ Category

Nine Earn Casino Management Certification

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by Rolf Clements

Nine casino managers, drawn from three of the tribe’s four gaming facilities, successfully completed the National Indian Gaming Association approved course which is conducted by the staff of Pawnee Nation College. Previously, ten other managers graduated from the first ever program on Dec. 8.

Tom Cunningham, the Oklahoma City-based regional director of the National Indian Gaming Association, was a guest speaker at the ceremony. He spoke of the tremendous job opportunities for qualified casino managers, with not only thousands of gaming jobs in Oklahoma, but tens of thousands of positions nationwide. “Protect your integrity and protect the integrity of your facility,” charged Cunningham to the class.

Pawnee Nation College instructor Andrew Gray stressed that the managers had earned not a certificate, but rather a certification in Indian Gaming Regulatory Management. Tribal Chairman John R. Shotton congratulated the managers and urged them to continue their education. “Our goal is to develop tribal members to be qualified to fill the majority of gaming management positions,” Shotton said. He added that continued education holds the keys to the future of the tribe. Shotton holds two degrees from the University of Oklahoma, a bachelor’s in Business Administration and a master’s in Public Administration.

Shotton listed many of the benefits to the Otoe-Missouria Tribe from income generated by the tribe’s successful gaming and other tribal business operations including increased social service programs, more jobs, the ability to provide college scholarship assistance and increased per capita to tribal members. “It’s so exciting to see where tribal members stick together, grow together, develop relationships,” said course graduate Laura Rosas.

“This particular training will be extremely beneficial and we hope to continue with more training of this type for our casino employees,” said Oliver LittleCook, who helped to coordinate the program and is the Employee Relations Manager/Trainer. Successfully completing the course and earning certification are Angela Barnett, Kim Burgess, Lawanda Canaday, Charisse Cline, Scott Miller, Bradley Moore Sr., Laura Rosas, Naomi Roubedeaux and Stephanie Ruff.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

May 13th, 2011 at 7:38 pm

Posted in casino,people

Otoe Singer is a ‘Screamer’

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by Heather Sarles

Fast. Brutal, Violent… Entertaining. That is how Otoe-Missouria tribal member Kyle K. Williams describes the music he creates with his heavy metal/thrash band With Smoke They Gave Their Offering. Their latest album is set to drop in January. Williams (vocals) and his band mates Kenny Higgins (drums), Nick Lehman (guitars) and Ian “Fitzy” Rogers (bass) have been performing in Oklahoma and surrounding states since 2002. He says that while today he has focused his talent on performing death metal, as a child he was exposed to a variety of musical genres. “I have been singing since I was a kid,” Williams says. “I have been listening to this type of music ever since I can remember. My sister and brothers always had some kind of music going whether it was R&B, hip hop, glam metal, metal, thrash just whatever was playing. I listened to all of it slam dancing in my room all alone.”

» Read the complete article on NativeTimes.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

January 15th, 2011 at 12:06 pm

Posted in people

Erica Pretty Eagle Moore

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Erica Pretty Eagle Moore, 17, was crowned as the 2010-11 Standing Bear Princess at the 17th annual powwow this past weekend. Of Osage, Otoe-Missouria and Pawnee descent, she is a senior at Woodland High School in Fairfax where she plays basketball and is interested in graphic design. Erica is the daughter of Ted and Terry Moore. [Photo]

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 28th, 2010 at 8:47 am

Posted in people,princess

Oklahoma AARP’s 2010 Indian Elder Honors

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by Craig Davis

Tribal leaders, dancers, educators, artists, ministers, a drum maker, finger weaver, language preservationists, matriarchs and patriarchs were among 50 older Indians recognized at the 2010 AARP Indian Elder Honors recently held in Oklahoma City.

“The extraordinary accomplishments of Indian elders from all parts of the state have left an indelible mark on their families, their tribes, their communities and the state as a whole,” said AARP Oklahoma Volunteer State President Marjorie Lyons. “Whether they served their tribes in a leadership position, devoted themselves to cultural preservation or were simply a quiet source of strength to their family, this group of honorees embodies the qualities of AARP Founder Ethel Percy Andrus who lived by the moto To serve and not to be served.”

2010 AARP Oklahoma Indian Honors Recipients include:

Cornelia Mae Gosney – Otoe-Missouria -  the cornerstone of her extended family Mrs. Gosney has had a profound effect on the lives of all who come into contact with her. A trusted spiritual adviser, she has spent countless hours praying and counseling others. Drawing on her own health and grief issues, Mrs. Gosney always has a comforting word of good advice or assurance. Her contribution to the Otoe-Missouri people is soft and quiet.

Rosetta Arkeketa LeClair – Otoe Missouria – has been an active business woman  in the Ponca City area and a respected member of the Otoe-Missouria Tribe for more than 40 years.  She belongs to the Buffalo Clan and is the granddaughter of Chief Arkeketa. Over the years, she has participated in many activities and cultural events including acting as chair of the Centennial Celebration for the Otoe-Missouria Tribe and serving on the Ponca Tribe Pow-Wow Committee. In 2002, she was declared Woman of the Year for the Texas Indian Heritage Association.  Mrs. Arkeketa LeClair received the “Red Arrow Award” from the Boy Scouts of America in 2009. Her community service has ranged from business where she served four years on the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, to health when she served two years on the board of directors at  Ponca City Hospital, as well as to education where she served two years on the board at Ponca City Vo-Tech.

Dwight Pickering – Caddo, Kaw & Otoe – has devoted the last 30 years of his life working in education and athletics. A third generation of his family to attend Haskell Junior College in Lawrence, Kan., Mr. Pickering went on to earn an undergraduate degree from Tarkio College in Tarkio, Missouri. Mr. Pickering has worked with some of the finest Indian students and athletes in the nation — some who became Champions and All Americans in their sports. Among his past positions have been director of Indian Education in the Sapulpa Public Schools and Tulsa Public Schools, Head Women’s Volleyball Coach, Head Men’s Cross Country Track and Athletic Director at Haskell Indian Nations University. Since 2003, he has worked for the Caddo Nation.  Among his honors and accomplishments are: Wal-Mart Teacher of the Year; Greater Tulsa Indian Affairs Commission Dream Keeper Award-Renard Strickland Education Leadership, Sapulpa Public School Distinguished Service Award; Member of the National Indian Education Association; Member of the Oklahoma Council on Indian Education; Vice-President of Oklahoma Indian Higher Education Scholarship Administrators Association; Member of the Tribal Education Department National Assembly; Oklahoma Coaches Association Cross-Country Coach of the Year, Region 2; Inducted in the Tarkio College Athletic Hall of Fame; President of the Native American Amateur Boxing Association and Vice-President of One Nation Empowerment (Athletic Development.)

» Read the complete article on NativeTimes.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 15th, 2010 at 7:55 am

Posted in education,people

Oklahoma’s Red Earth Festival

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by Brandy McDonnell

Despite the oppressive heat, hundreds of spectators crowded outside the Cox Convention Center to watch the 24th annual Red Earth Native American Cultural Festival open with its annual parade. Viewers clapped, cheered and bobbed to the patriotic music as the National Guard band made its first Red Earth parade appearance. The festival’s first grand entry Friday ended with veterans among the dancers and from the audience taking the Cox arena floor to accompany the three color guards in a special victory dance.

“I’m glad they’ve done that this year. … I think it’s the greatest thing they could do,” said Darrell Moore, a Pawnee native who now lives in Dallas. “If it wasn’t for the veterans, they wouldn’t be able to have this.” The Army veteran, who is of Pawnee and Otoe-Missouria descent, wears a red, white and blue ribbon on his black and green regalia when he competes in the golden age men division of the Southern Straight Dance.

» Read the complete article on NewsOK.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

June 21st, 2010 at 6:37 pm

American Indian Languages get ‘Breath of Life’

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by James S. Tyree

Tracey Moore is a member of the Osage, Otoe-Missouria, Pawnee and Sac & Fox tribes who aims to help keep their disappearing languages alive by learning, speaking and teaching them. She learned how recently during the Breath of Life workshop at the University of Oklahoma’s Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

The May 24-28 program taught participants how to conduct linguistic research on tribal languages, starting with archival materials at the museum. The program is designed for people from tribes that lack fluent speakers of their language who want to help preserve the language for future generations. Moore was eager to return home to Fairfax, where she would study even further and share that knowledge with her students in the Osage Nation’s Language Program. “It’s just inspiring; I can’t wait to go back and dig in,” she said. “With the linguistics part, I will have the ability to learn all my languages.”

» Read the complete article on NewsOK.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

June 9th, 2010 at 6:24 pm

Walk for a Nuclear Free Future

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by Leeann Root

The Central New York offices of Indian Country Today are typically rather quiet. But the sound of drums April 8 sparked the worker’s attention. A multicultural group of about 20 began a 700-mile “Walk for a Nuclear Free Future” March 7 in Salamanca, New York, to call attention to the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, which is scheduled for May 3, 2010.

According to an event announcement the treaty’s objective is “to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and weapons technology, to promote cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to further the goal of achieving nuclear disarmament.”

Larry Bringing Good, a Cheyenne Arapahoe and Otoe-Missouria from Troy, New York, said the walk began at the West Valley Nuclear Waste Site in Salamanca, “where erosion is going to cause nuclear waste to leak into the Great Lakes and contaminate the water.” He said waste “they say is lower hazard” has been stored there for years.

» Read the complete article on Indian Country Today.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

April 15th, 2010 at 8:28 am

Posted in people,politics

Veteran Dancer Performs All Over

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by Will Chavez

Robert Murray is a traditional dancer and has been headman dancer for two of the tribes he belongs to – Otoe-Missouri and Iowa. He is also half Ponca, and is proud of all three tribes and celebrates and shares the culture of each one. He hoop dances and performs the Eagle dance, and at 51 years old, still “fancy dances every once in a while.” This dance is usually reserved for younger powwow dancers.

He first danced in a powwow arena when he was 19 months old at a Ponca powwow. He said he has danced every year since then except for a total of three years, when he stopped dancing to observe deaths in his family. “I’ve been in that arena for a long time,” he said. He also has been singing with the powwow drum group Yellowhammer for nearly 17 years. The group travels to powwows throughout the country, he said. He also finds time to sing with the Zotigh drum group.

» Read the complete article on NativeTimes.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

March 25th, 2010 at 8:47 pm

Posted in dance,people

Leon O. Dailey Turns 80

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Leon O. Dailey of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, celebrated his 80th birthday on Sunday, January 17. He was feted with a family dinner on Saturday evening and a church reception on Sunday.

Dailey was born on the Otoe-Missouria Indian Reservation near Red Rock, Oklahoma, one of seven children of the late Dewey and Susie Caleb Dailey. Leon is from the first generation of his family to be born with the surname Dailey. His grandfather, So-Jay-Inga, took the name Charles Dailey as an adult and passed the surname onto his son. Dailey is a descendant of Ah-Hah-Che-Ke-Saw-Ke, one of the Missouria chiefs who signed the tribe’s Treaty of 1854.

Dailey attended the Pawnee Indian boarding school and completed high school at Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. After graduation he helped on the family farm and worked briefly as a plasterer in Stillwater and Tulsa, Oklahoma. He was inducted into the Army during the Korean War. After completing basic training at Fort Stewart, Georgia, he was transferred to Indiantown Gap Military Reservation to join the 5th Infantry Division, anti-aircraft artillery. It was during his stay there that Dailey met Caroline Reese of Palmyra. The two were married the following year. The couple has resided in Lebanon County ever since and will celebrate their 58th wedding anniversary in April.

Dailey has worked primarily in construction. For many years he was employed with Granger General Contractor and later with Buchmoyer Contractor. He retired from Hauck Manufacturing in Cleona.

As a charter member of the Jonestown Bible Church, Dailey has sung in the choir and taught Sunday school for more than five decades. At various times he has served on the Elder Board and as a Deacon of the church. He has been active in many church programs over the years, such as conducting music and worship services at local nursing homes.

Leon and Caroline are parents of five children. They also have seven grandchildren. Leon Dailey and his children are enrolled members of the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma.

» Originally published in the Lebanon Daily News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

January 18th, 2010 at 11:09 pm

A Role Model for Native Youth

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by Lorraine Jessepe

Jessica Moore’s passion for art, mathematics and culture has taken her across the world. Moore (Osage/Otoe-Missouria/Sac and Fox/Pawnee) is a 24-year-old Oklahoma State University student in her final year of the landscape architecture program.

“I have been fortunate to travel abroad to a number of countries, which created a new passion for me – a love for other cultures and other societies of this world,” said Moore, a 2009 National Center for American Indian Enterprise 40 Under 40 honoree. So far, her studies have taken her to France, Italy, Thailand, Japan and Peru.

As a young girl, Moore always wanted to be a doctor, but her interest in art and math eventually led her to architecture. Later, an interest in environmentalism led her to change her field to landscape architecture. “I actually didn’t know what landscape architecture was until my sophomore year at OSU.” It’s a multidisciplinary field involving the planning and design of natural and built environments. “My design philosophy as a landscape architect is to make space animate, special and memorable in a way that invokes the emotions that the owner wishes to express or feels,” Moore said.

» Read the complete article on Indian Country Today.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

December 5th, 2009 at 1:29 pm

Posted in education,people