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Otoe-Missouria News Archive

News archive for the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma

Archive for the ‘tribal news’ Category

Tribe Reflects on Blood Quantum Enrollment Change

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by Heather Sarles

It has been a little over a year since the Otoe-Missouria tribal membership voted to lower the enrollment requirements from ¼ degree of Otoe-Missouria blood to 1/8. In that time the tribe has seen an 88% increase in membership.

Chairman John Shotton says the motivation for changing the requirements was simple—a shrinking tribal membership. “At the time we started this initiative, we had about 1,400 members,” Shotton says. “Many of those on the role were less than 1/2 Otoe-Missouria. This was due to a number of reasons, primarily intermarriage between other tribes and non-Indians. Something had to be done to address the issue, if enrollment requirements stayed unchanged, we would be facing a rapidly dwindling enrollment over the next 20 years or so.”

With that prospect on the horizon, the Tribal Council began a push to change the enrollment requirements. However, the enrollment requirements themselves are set forth in the tribal constitution. Any constitutional changes had to be performed by secretarial election, which is the BIA equivalent of a referendum…

» Read the complete article on NativeTimes.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

November 10th, 2010 at 9:31 am

Posted in tribal news

Otoe-Missouria to Host Health Fair

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The Otoe-Missouria Tribe Health Department hosts a Health Fair this Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Cultural Building on tribal campus. The day begins with the tribe’s Special Diabetes Program for Indians sponsoring a one mile Fun Run/Walk/Stroll. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. at the Health Department and the Fun Run/Walk/Stroll will begin at 9:00 a.m.  All participants will receive a T-shirt.

This year the Oklahoma Blood Institute will be on campus with their mobile blood unit. The OBI will provide T-shirts to all persons who donate blood. Donors will also be entered in a drawing for a 32-inch LCD TV and DVD player. A total of 26 vendors are scheduled for this event including: Kaw Nation Child Support Services, the Veteran’s Administration, Northern Oklahoma College, Hospice of North Central Oklahoma, Biker’s Against Child Abuse, Noble County DHS, AARP of Oklahoma, the National Indian Women’s Health Resource Center and many more.

Free flu shots will be offered to attendees by Pawnee IHS Clinic representatives.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 21st, 2010 at 8:49 am

Posted in health,tribal news

Athletic Commissions have no say on MMA Events on Tribal Lands

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by Josh Gross

“It’s hard for a lot people to understand that we have absolutely no control over what happens on tribal land [in regards to Mixed Martial Arts],” said Joe Miller, executive director of the Oklahoma State Athletic Commission. “They can do what they want to. Now if it was boxing it would be a different story.”

This is how Miller became aware of Shine Fights, a Florida-based MMA promotional company which, after failing to receive licenses in Virginia and Oklahoma, partnered last Friday with the Otoe-Missouria Tribe for an eight-man, one-night tournament at the First Council Casino in Newkirk, Oklahoma…

The Otoe-Missouria Tribe is one of 28 federally recognized tribal lands in Oklahoma. Of those 28, only three have formed commissions to regulate combat sports, specifically boxing, as required by federal legislation. Others signed compacts with the state to regulate events when they hold boxing cards. And some, like Otoe-Missouria, have no athletic commission regulation whatsoever. The Association of Boxing Commissions Tribal Advisory Committee reached out to Otoe-Missouria, but was powerless to do anything other than offer its input — which needs to change, said the organization’s president, Tim Lueckenhoff.

» Read the complete article on SI.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 16th, 2010 at 8:10 am

New Site Connects Citizens to Tribe

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After nearly a year without a Web presence, the Otoe-Missouria Tribe launched its new official Web site www.omtribe.org. The new site provides information about the tribe, its businesses, tribal departments and services offered to tribal citizens.

“With members living all over the world, the internet is a great tool to help keep everyone informed,” Tribal Chairman John R. Shotton says. “And it is important that the website be as comprehensive as possible so that tribal members have access to the information they need.” The new site is divided into four main areas: government, tribal enterprises, departments and culture. The tribe’s Public Information Officer Heather Sarles says that the site was designed this way for ease of navigation.

» Read the complete article on NativeTimes.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

April 14th, 2010 at 8:22 am

Posted in tribal news

Tribes Target Grandchildren in Planning

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Although Indian country is divided along many lines – history, culture and language, among others – the collective energy of a number of tribes seems directed at a common target – the grandchildren.

The grandchildren seem, at least anecdotally, to be driving some current tribes to revisit their enrollment policies, as grandparents seek to ensure full tribal status for their youngest family members. There are plenty of high-profile, contentious, enrollment-related issues, including the role of government in disenrollment disputes, but in the ongoing evolution of Indian status and survival, possible shortcomings in the regular enrollment process itself seem to be preoccupying a number of tribal nations…

When the Three Affiliated Tribes of North Dakota voted in 2008 to change from a one-fourth quantum to lineal descent, it meant a possibility that otherwise-disqualified grandchildren could be considered for enrollment. A number of Oklahoma tribes, including the Otoe-Missouria and Pawnee, have recently reduced blood quantum requirements from one-fourth to one-eighth, as have other tribes across the U.S., including the Hoopa Valley Indian Tribe in California.

» Read the complete article on Indian Country Today.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

March 5th, 2010 at 2:25 pm

Posted in tribal news

Otoe-Missouria Swear in New Council

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Otoe-Missouria tribal members and staff gathered in the historic Council Building on November 13 to witness the declared winners of the recent tribal elections take the oath of office.

Incumbents Charles Moncooyea and Baptiste Shunatona were re-elected to the offices of Vice Chairman and Treasurer respectively. New to the council is Alvin L. Moore who was elected to the long vacant Third Member seat.

In the November 7 election for Vice Chairman, Moncooyea received a plurality of 34.47 percent of the votes cast in the six-person contest. In the five candidate field for the vacant Third Member position, Moore garnered 39.52 percent of the tally. Treasurer incumbent Baptiste Shunatona easily won re-election against three opponents by receiving a clear majority of 52.77 percent of the ballots cast.

Also taking the oath of office were new tribal election board members Ranae Kihega, Linda Francis, Tina Youker and Jodi McGlasin. The election board members were elected at the General Council meeting also held on November 7 at tribal headquarters in Red Rock. [photo]

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

November 19th, 2009 at 9:44 am

Posted in politics,tribal news

Three Elected to Otoe-Missouria Council

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by Rolf Clements

Voting members of the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma went to the polls Saturday, returning two incumbents and filling a long vacant Third Member seat on the tribe’s governing Tribal Council. The Otoe-Missouria Election Board reports that 471 of the 1,561 registered voters cast ballots for a turnout of 30.17 percent during the 12-hour election.

In the contest for Vice-Chairman, incumbent Charles J. Moncooyea outdistanced a field of six candidates, garnering 162 votes for 34.47 percent to win by plurality. Votes for the other five candidates were: Arlen W. Lightfoot, 92 votes for 19.57 percent; Charles “Chap” Tillman, 84 votes for 17.87 percent; Truman Black, 63 votes for 13.40 percent; Claude Dailey, 42 votes for 8.84 percent; and James Black, 27 votes for 5.74 percent.

Treasurer incumbent Baptiste Shunatona easily won re-election against three opponents by receiving a clear majority of ballots cast, 248 votes for 52.77 percent. Others receiving votes for Treasurer were: Rosetta “Midge” Blueback, 118 votes for 25.11 percent; James W. Overby III, 67 votes for 14.26 percent; and Joseph L. Black, 37 votes for 7.87 percent.

In a tight race for Third Member, Alvin L. Moore edged Marcella E. Harper by 30 votes out of 463 votes cast in the five candidate field. Moore received 183 votes for 39.52 percent with Harper right behind at 153 votes for 33.05 percent. Others receiving votes for Third Member were: Rosella R. DeRoin, 61 votes for 13.17 percent; Earlene Miller, 42 votes for 9.07 percent; and Vernice K. Willis, 24 votes for 5.18 percent.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

November 11th, 2009 at 7:35 pm

Posted in politics,tribal news

Otoe-Missouria Tribe Benefits from Recovery Act Water Funds to Improve Water Services

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The Otoe-Missouria Tribe will have improved access to vital water services through funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Indian Health Service (IHS) today announced $90 million nationwide in ‘shovel ready’ infrastructure projects designed to better protect human and environmental health in Indian Country.

“EPA and Oklahoma tribes share a common interest when it comes to caring for people and the environment,” said EPA Acting Regional Administrator Lawrence E. Starfield. “The Recovery Act is helping us fund more projects by the Otoe-Missouria and other tribes that will deliver long-term benefits for their communities and respective lands.”

» Read the full news release on the EPA website.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

July 11th, 2009 at 7:47 pm

Posted in health,tribal news

Otoe-Missouria Grant Changes

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In a historic vote tallied Friday evening, Otoe-Missouria tribal voters overwhelming passed a constitutional amendment changing tribal membership requirements by a margin of 358 for the amendment to only 71 against.

The first ever amendment to the tribal constitution lowers the minimum blood quantum requirement to one-eighth degree of Otoe-Missouria descent.

“It’s real exciting and I’m gratified that it was a landslide decision,” stated Tribal Chairman John R. Shotton on Saturday. Ballots were counted by an election board, composed of Bureau of Indian Affairs and tribal officials, in the historic Agency Building which has recently been renovated and is once again used as the seat of tribal government. The vote was seen as a matter of survival, according to Shotton. The approximately 1,400 member tribe had only 141 members under the age of 18 before the vote.

Shotton stated the vote becomes official after a three-day protest period and new enrollments will thereafter be accepted.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

June 15th, 2009 at 7:47 pm

Posted in tribal news

Fiber Optics Bring Power and Speed

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“Power and speed for the Otoe-Missouria Tribe’s telecommunications system is on the way,” said Tribal Councilmember Wendell Bollinger. Wendell is spearheading a drive to replace the tribe’s present copper wire system with up-to-date fiber-optics.

Fiber-optic lines are strands of very pure glass as thin as a human hair that, arranged in bundles called optical cables, carry digital information over long distances. Fiber optic cables have several advantages over traditional metal lines, like copper. They have a much greater bandwidth, which means they can carry more data; they are less susceptible to interference; and are much thinner and lighter.

The greater bandwidth means the tribe’s present computers will be faster once the fiber- optic system is installed, Wendell said, and will allow the computers’ processors to work faster and more efficiently. In addition, the tribe’s telephones and computers can be on the same line, which will save money for the tribe.

Last year AT&T laid a fiber-optic line all the way from Stillwater to Ponca City along Highway 177, which fronts the tribal offices. The tribe plans to run a cable off the AT&T box that comes into the tribal campus and cover all of the tribal buildings. Two buildings are already equipped with fiber-optics lines, the Title VI and the Headstart buildings, but for some reason the project wasn’t completed at that time.

The power and speed of the new fiber-optics system will also provide the tribe more ability for expansion, Wendell said. Right now several new buildings for the tribal campus are in the planning stages – a water treatment center, maintenance building, transportation building and a community building.

He also envisions the tribe being able to provide this same high-speed internet service to the families in tribal housing, which could help open opportunities to those of any age living there with their studies, including long distance learning. In addition, the Pawnee Tribal College has already shown interest in working with the Otoe-Missourias in providing long distance learning opportunities to the surrounding communities. Providing computers in the tribal library, along with the high-speed internet access, could also assist those without home computers to further their education.

Wendell has been working with computers since the 1960s. While in the U.S. Army, he took advantage of the opportunity to attend classes at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) where he studied programming languages.

Coming from the military – where everything is organized and in order – he was dismayed to find the tribe had a computer system that would go down sometimes two to three times a week. While the system has been improved considerably, the new fiber-optics cables will modernize it into the 21st century.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

May 28th, 2009 at 10:01 am

Posted in tribal news