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Otoe-Missouria News Archive

News archive for the Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Oklahoma

Elton Burns Ely Sr.

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Elton Burns Ely Sr., resident of Wellington, Kansas and member of the Ponca Nation passed away Friday, December 3, 2010 in Wellington, Kansas. He was 59. Elton was born June 26, 1951in Pawnee, Oklahoma the son of Joe and Mary Ely. His early education was in the Red Rock area schools. He was married to Cheryll Kennedy on July 26, 1974 in Arkansas City. His enjoyments were spending time with his grandchildren, bowling and playing pool.

He is survived by his wife, Cheryll, of the home; one daughter, Jennifer Vogelsang of Arkansas City; four granddaughters, Shayla, Brittnee, Keylee and Gabby; four other grandchildren and many other family and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents and one son, Elton Burns Ely Jr. Graveside services will be held at 11 a.m. Monday, December 6, 2010 at the Otoe-Missouria Cemetery near Red Rock. Arrangements are under the direction of Grace Memorial Chapel. Casket bearers will be Brittnee Vogelsang, Vandel Kent, Bryce Marr, Tyler Manuel, Cody Kent and Larry Freek.

» Originally published in the Wellington Daily News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

December 9th, 2010 at 9:45 am

Posted in memorial

Tribe Reflects on Blood Quantum Enrollment Change

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by Heather Sarles

It has been a little over a year since the Otoe-Missouria tribal membership voted to lower the enrollment requirements from ¼ degree of Otoe-Missouria blood to 1/8. In that time the tribe has seen an 88% increase in membership.

Chairman John Shotton says the motivation for changing the requirements was simple—a shrinking tribal membership. “At the time we started this initiative, we had about 1,400 members,” Shotton says. “Many of those on the role were less than 1/2 Otoe-Missouria. This was due to a number of reasons, primarily intermarriage between other tribes and non-Indians. Something had to be done to address the issue, if enrollment requirements stayed unchanged, we would be facing a rapidly dwindling enrollment over the next 20 years or so.”

With that prospect on the horizon, the Tribal Council began a push to change the enrollment requirements. However, the enrollment requirements themselves are set forth in the tribal constitution. Any constitutional changes had to be performed by secretarial election, which is the BIA equivalent of a referendum…

» Read the complete article on NativeTimes.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

November 10th, 2010 at 9:31 am

Posted in tribal news

Brenda Gale Burgess

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Brenda Gale Burgess was born on July 3, 1960, in Lawton to Raymond French and Cecelia Hummingbird French. She passed from this life on Friday, October 15, 2010, at her home in Red Rock, having reached the age of 50 years, 3 months and 15 days. She married Benjamin Burgess on April 9, 1980, in Oklahoma City, and they moved to Red Rock from Oklahoma City in April of 1984. She was affiliated with the Otoe Baptist Church, and enjoyed her grandchildren, playing bingo, going to pow-wows and keeping up with housework duties.

Brenda is survived by her father, Raymond French of Oklahoma City; husband, Bennie Burgess of Red Rock; four children, Vestina Burgess, Ben Burgess Jr., Frank Burgess and Georgette Burgess, all of Red Rock; three brothers, Gary Pohleman, Bradley French and Brian French, all of Oklahoma City; three sisters, Vera Pohleman, Raynelle French and Larue French, all of Oklahoma City; and four grandchildren, Allen Jones of Red Rock, Iverson Jones of Red Rock, Seneca Burgess of Tulsa and Morningstar Burgess of Tulsa; as well as a number of other relatives and many friends. Brenda was preceded in death by her mother, Cecelia French.

Services are scheduled for 12 p.m. Monday, October 18, at Otoe-Missouria Cultural Building in Red Rock with Jimmy Kenner and Randy Whitehorn officiating. Interment will be at Cleghorn Cemetery in Red Rock under the direction of Poteet Funeral Home of Pawnee. Casket bearers will be Ben Burgess Jr., Frank Lee Burgess, Ben Burgess Sr., Bradley French, Brian French and Sylvester “Sly” Isaac.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

October 18th, 2010 at 8:54 am

Posted in memorial

Charles Owen Tillman

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Charles Owen “Chap” Tillman Sr., Red Rock resident, passed away on Friday, September 24, 2010, at his home. He was 94. Charles was born on April 21, 1916, in Red Rock, the son of Asbarry Tillman and Bertha Arkeketa Tillman. Chap went to school at Red Rock until the 11th grade. He later went to Haskell Institute, an Indian boarding school in Lawrence, Kansas. Chap played sports at Haskell and played basketball and baseball on the varsity (college) teams. He graduated salutatorian in 1934 and was offered two scholarships, one to Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, and Northeastern State College in Tahlequah. He chose Northeastern. After one year at Northeastern he had an offer to continue his education at Central College in Edmond with tuition, room and board paid. He accepted and transferred to Central his second year.

He married Josephine Good, and in 1941, the marriage ended and he married Ella Koshiway Morrell, and they moved to the old homestead east of Red Rock where Chap farmed. He continued his education at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. He received a Bachelor Degree, Master Degree and completed all the course work toward a Ph.D. Degree. He was hired as Principal of Red Rock School, with additional duties of teacher and coach of the boys and girls high school basketball team. Chap held numerous positions of employment. He was Superintendent of Orlando High School, Braman High School, Oologah High School, Concho Indian School and Carter Seminary. He served numerous times on the Otoe-Missouria Tribal Council and he was elected first tribal chairman after the Otoe-Missouria Constitution was adopted in 1984, the constitution which he helped to write. He served several terms as Chairman and Vice-Chairman, being elected or appointed each time. Chap had succeeded in both the white mans world and his Indian World. His success in the white mans world is all the more remarkable as it was in a period of time when Indians were discriminated against and given very little opportunity to succeed.

Casket bearers for the service will be Stephen Tillman, Timothy Mays, Eli Lauffenburger, Kyle Robedeaux, Charles Kihega and Michael Darnaby. Honorary bearers will be Steve Dummer, Dewey Daily and Harold Kihega.

He is survived by his children, Charles Tillman Jr., of Fairfax, Nancy Kyle of Fairfax, Owen Tillman of Red Rock, Diane Tillman of Broken Arrow, Angela Lauffenburger of Plano, Texas and Stephen Tillman of Yukon, Okla.; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren as well as numerous nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by his mother, Bertha Arkeketa Tillman Carson and father, Asbarry Tillman; son, Rodney Tillman; daughter, Denise Tillman; and sister, Ophelia Tillman Overby.

There will be a traditional noon meal before the funeral service. Alberta “Blondie” Atkins will be in charge of the services. The funeral service will be held at 2 p.m., Monday, Sept. 27, at the Otoe Baptist Church in Red Rock, with Rev. Jimmy Kinnard officiating. Burial will follow at the Red Rock Cemetery under the direction of Grace Memorial Chapel.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 28th, 2010 at 9:01 am

Posted in memorial

Erica Pretty Eagle Moore

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Erica Pretty Eagle Moore, 17, was crowned as the 2010-11 Standing Bear Princess at the 17th annual powwow this past weekend. Of Osage, Otoe-Missouria and Pawnee descent, she is a senior at Woodland High School in Fairfax where she plays basketball and is interested in graphic design. Erica is the daughter of Ted and Terry Moore. [Photo]

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 28th, 2010 at 8:47 am

Posted in people,princess

Otoe-Missouria to Host Health Fair

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The Otoe-Missouria Tribe Health Department hosts a Health Fair this Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Cultural Building on tribal campus. The day begins with the tribe’s Special Diabetes Program for Indians sponsoring a one mile Fun Run/Walk/Stroll. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. at the Health Department and the Fun Run/Walk/Stroll will begin at 9:00 a.m.  All participants will receive a T-shirt.

This year the Oklahoma Blood Institute will be on campus with their mobile blood unit. The OBI will provide T-shirts to all persons who donate blood. Donors will also be entered in a drawing for a 32-inch LCD TV and DVD player. A total of 26 vendors are scheduled for this event including: Kaw Nation Child Support Services, the Veteran’s Administration, Northern Oklahoma College, Hospice of North Central Oklahoma, Biker’s Against Child Abuse, Noble County DHS, AARP of Oklahoma, the National Indian Women’s Health Resource Center and many more.

Free flu shots will be offered to attendees by Pawnee IHS Clinic representatives.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 21st, 2010 at 8:49 am

Posted in health,tribal news

Athletic Commissions have no say on MMA Events on Tribal Lands

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by Josh Gross

“It’s hard for a lot people to understand that we have absolutely no control over what happens on tribal land [in regards to Mixed Martial Arts],” said Joe Miller, executive director of the Oklahoma State Athletic Commission. “They can do what they want to. Now if it was boxing it would be a different story.”

This is how Miller became aware of Shine Fights, a Florida-based MMA promotional company which, after failing to receive licenses in Virginia and Oklahoma, partnered last Friday with the Otoe-Missouria Tribe for an eight-man, one-night tournament at the First Council Casino in Newkirk, Oklahoma…

The Otoe-Missouria Tribe is one of 28 federally recognized tribal lands in Oklahoma. Of those 28, only three have formed commissions to regulate combat sports, specifically boxing, as required by federal legislation. Others signed compacts with the state to regulate events when they hold boxing cards. And some, like Otoe-Missouria, have no athletic commission regulation whatsoever. The Association of Boxing Commissions Tribal Advisory Committee reached out to Otoe-Missouria, but was powerless to do anything other than offer its input — which needs to change, said the organization’s president, Tim Lueckenhoff.

» Read the complete article on SI.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 16th, 2010 at 8:10 am

Oklahoma AARP’s 2010 Indian Elder Honors

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by Craig Davis

Tribal leaders, dancers, educators, artists, ministers, a drum maker, finger weaver, language preservationists, matriarchs and patriarchs were among 50 older Indians recognized at the 2010 AARP Indian Elder Honors recently held in Oklahoma City.

“The extraordinary accomplishments of Indian elders from all parts of the state have left an indelible mark on their families, their tribes, their communities and the state as a whole,” said AARP Oklahoma Volunteer State President Marjorie Lyons. “Whether they served their tribes in a leadership position, devoted themselves to cultural preservation or were simply a quiet source of strength to their family, this group of honorees embodies the qualities of AARP Founder Ethel Percy Andrus who lived by the moto To serve and not to be served.”

2010 AARP Oklahoma Indian Honors Recipients include:

Cornelia Mae Gosney – Otoe-Missouria -  the cornerstone of her extended family Mrs. Gosney has had a profound effect on the lives of all who come into contact with her. A trusted spiritual adviser, she has spent countless hours praying and counseling others. Drawing on her own health and grief issues, Mrs. Gosney always has a comforting word of good advice or assurance. Her contribution to the Otoe-Missouri people is soft and quiet.

Rosetta Arkeketa LeClair – Otoe Missouria – has been an active business woman  in the Ponca City area and a respected member of the Otoe-Missouria Tribe for more than 40 years.  She belongs to the Buffalo Clan and is the granddaughter of Chief Arkeketa. Over the years, she has participated in many activities and cultural events including acting as chair of the Centennial Celebration for the Otoe-Missouria Tribe and serving on the Ponca Tribe Pow-Wow Committee. In 2002, she was declared Woman of the Year for the Texas Indian Heritage Association.  Mrs. Arkeketa LeClair received the “Red Arrow Award” from the Boy Scouts of America in 2009. Her community service has ranged from business where she served four years on the Ponca City Chamber of Commerce, to health when she served two years on the board of directors at  Ponca City Hospital, as well as to education where she served two years on the board at Ponca City Vo-Tech.

Dwight Pickering – Caddo, Kaw & Otoe – has devoted the last 30 years of his life working in education and athletics. A third generation of his family to attend Haskell Junior College in Lawrence, Kan., Mr. Pickering went on to earn an undergraduate degree from Tarkio College in Tarkio, Missouri. Mr. Pickering has worked with some of the finest Indian students and athletes in the nation — some who became Champions and All Americans in their sports. Among his past positions have been director of Indian Education in the Sapulpa Public Schools and Tulsa Public Schools, Head Women’s Volleyball Coach, Head Men’s Cross Country Track and Athletic Director at Haskell Indian Nations University. Since 2003, he has worked for the Caddo Nation.  Among his honors and accomplishments are: Wal-Mart Teacher of the Year; Greater Tulsa Indian Affairs Commission Dream Keeper Award-Renard Strickland Education Leadership, Sapulpa Public School Distinguished Service Award; Member of the National Indian Education Association; Member of the Oklahoma Council on Indian Education; Vice-President of Oklahoma Indian Higher Education Scholarship Administrators Association; Member of the Tribal Education Department National Assembly; Oklahoma Coaches Association Cross-Country Coach of the Year, Region 2; Inducted in the Tarkio College Athletic Hall of Fame; President of the Native American Amateur Boxing Association and Vice-President of One Nation Empowerment (Athletic Development.)

» Read the complete article on NativeTimes.com.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 15th, 2010 at 7:55 am

Posted in education,people

Barona Powwow Focuses on Heritage

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by Sandra Dibble

The 40th annual Barona Indian Powwow (San Diego, CA), which started Friday and ended Sunday, drew some 2,000 spectators and close to 300 participants — drummers and dancers from dozens of tribes from across the United States who competed for $60,000 in prizes. For many, it was also a chance to connect with old friends, and for others, a chance to feel connected to their heritage…

Drum groups included the Red Rock Crossing Singers made up of Otoe-Missouria Indians from Oklahoma; a Navajo group from Teesto, Arizona; the Porcupine Singers, a northern Plains style traditional Lakota singing group; and an urban youth group from Los Angeles, whose members belong to different tribes.

» Read the complete article on Sign On San Diego.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 6th, 2010 at 7:47 am

Posted in dance

Adrienne Lanae Littlecrow

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Adrienne Lanae Littlecrow, infant daughter of Jeff and Margie Littlecrow, died on Monday, August 30, 2010, at OU Medical Center. Adrienne is survived by her parents, Jeff and Margie; one sister, Meredith Jones; two brothers, Aiden Littlecrow and Ashton Jones; and her grandparents. Adrienne was preceded in death by her two brothers, Aaron Littlecrow and Richard Jones.

The noon meal will be held on Thursday, Sept. 2, at Otoe-Missouria Cultural Center at Red Rock, followed by the funeral at 2 p.m. Burial will be in Otoe-Missouria Cemetery under the direction of Grace Memorial Chapel.

» Originally published in the Ponca City News.

Submitted by BrokenClaw

September 3rd, 2010 at 9:04 am

Posted in memorial